FAIRY / HIP is due this Friday, 2pm!

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Oh, it’s on, my friends… we aren’t even going to beat around the proverbial bush… let’s just get to this week’s inspiration for FAIRY / HIP due this Friday, 2pm!!!

Wikipedia rules the internet when it comes to defining things and describing stuffs, and you can’t say otherwise… so let’s take some excerpts and links to what wiki says about this week’s words:

Fairy:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairy

Fairy/faerie
(Faery, Fay, Fae, Wee Folk, Good Folk, Fair Folk)

478px-SophieAndersonTakethefairfaceofWoman

A fairy (also faery, faerie, fay, fae; euphemistically wee folk, good folk, people of peace, fair folk, etc.)[1] is a type of mythical being or legendary creature, a form of spirit, often described as metaphysical, supernatural or preternatural. Fairies resemble various beings of other mythologies, though even folklore that uses the term fairy offers many definitions. Sometimes the term describes any magical creature, including goblins or gnomes: at other times, the term only describes a specific type of more ethereal creature.[2]

The name Fairy Tern can also refer to the White Tern (Gygis alba)


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Fairy (Fairy Tern):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairy_Tern

Fairy-Tern-5

The Fairy Tern (Sternula nereis) is a small tern which occurs in the southwestern Pacific.

There are three subspecies:

  • Australian Fairy Tern, Sternula nereis nereis – breeds in Australia
  • New Caledonian Fairy Tern, Sternula nereis exsul – breeds in New Caledonia
  • New Zealand Fairy Tern, Sternula nereis davisae – breeds in northern New Zealand

Formerly classified as a Species of Least Concern by the IUCN,[2] recent research shows that its numbers have been decreasing rapidly throughout its range; the New Zealand subspecies has been on the brink of extinction for decades. The Fairy Tern was consequently uplisted to Vulnerable status in 2008.[2] The New Zealand Fairy Tern has numerous breeding areas, largely incorporating the upper-north region of the North Island. To date, there are only 42 known individuals left. With a breeding program in place by the New Zealand Department of Conservation, the population has gradually increased to the current number.

 

Hip:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hip

Hip (anatomy)Fig-509-Anterior-view-of-the-ligaments-of-the-hip-joint   In vertebrate anatomy, hip (or "coxa"[1] in medical terminology) refer to either an anatomical region or a joint.

The hip region is located lateral to the gluteal  region (i. e. the buttock), inferior to the iliac crest, and overlying the greater trochanter of the femur, or "thigh bone".[2] In adults, three of the bones of the pelvis have fused into the hip bone which forms part of the hip region.

The hip joint, scientifically referred to as the acetabulofemoral joint (art. coxae), is the joint between the femur and acetabulum of the pelvis and its primary function is to support the weight of the body in both static (e. g. standing) and dynamic (e. g. walking or running) postures. The hip joints are the most important part in retaining balance. The pelvic inclination angle, which is the single most important element of human body posture, is adjusted at the hips.

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Hip (Cool):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hip_%28slang%29

Hip most_memorable_oscar_dresses is also a slang term meaning fashionably current and in the know. Hip is the opposite of square or prude.

Hip, like cool, does not refer to one specific quality. What is considered hip is continuously changing. The term hip is recorded in African American Vernacular English (AAVE) in the early 1900s, derived from the earlier form hep. In the 1930s and 1940s, it had become a common slang term, particularly in the African-American dominated jazz scene. Despite research and speculation by both amateur and professional etymologists, the previous origins of the term hip and hep are disputed. Many etymologists believe that the terms hip, hep and hepcat derive from the west African Wolof language word hepicat, which means "one who has his eyes open".[1] Some etymologists reject this, however, tracing the origin of this putative etymology to David Dalby, a scholar of African Languages who tentatively suggested the idea in the 1960s,[2] and some have even adopted the denigration "to cry Wolof" as a general dismissal or belittlement of etymologies they believe to be based on "superficial similarities" rather than documented attribution.[3]

Alternative theories trace the word's origins to those who used opium recreationally in the 19th century. Opium smokers commonly consumed the drug lying on their sides, or on the hip, but this etymology is rejected by Sheidlower.[2] Because opium smoking was a practice of socially influential trend-setting individuals, the cachet it enjoyed led to the circulation of the term hip by way of a kind of synecdoche.[citation needed] Another explanation was that users would develop a sore on their hips from lying motionless on it. Thus to "have the hip" was to be an initiate.

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